Kudos and Thanks

When you care about your students, program and teaching/learning space (aka the library and its collection) as much as I do, it can be a very difficult decision to take a leave from school and bequeath your professional world to another (albeit temporarily).

Fortunately for me, while recuperating and rehabbing at home from hip replacement surgery, my library has been in good hands under the direction of my former student teacher, Jenn Potter. This post is dedicated to her. Kudos and thanks to Mrs. Potter for inspiring the children, supporting the curriculum and taking such good care of the library itself.

While I planned out the first week of lesson plans and left a general direction for the remaining four weeks of my leave, I encouraged Jenn to improvise, test out lessons she will use next year in her own library, and to be responsive to what the students and teachers needed while I was out. That she did!

In her second week of teaching, she devised creative mini-projects for each grade applying not only the learning objectives from the previous week, but also special get well and birthday greetings for me. These she hand-delivered, providing me hours of reading pleasure during my days cooped up at home missing Peaslee School.

Here then is a retrospective of their work– designed by Jenn as assessments, but for me they were gifts bestowed, full of sensitivity, imagination, humor and the hearts and souls of my students.

Kindergarten students learned about the five senses through the book Hello Ocean (by Pam Munoz Ryan). Each class then created a gigantic birthday card featuring presents I could SEE, pizzas I could SMELL, favors I could TOUCH, happy party sounds to HEAR and cakes to TASTE.

Experiencing books in different ways is one of the units I teach in first grade. I asked Jenn to read Mouse Match (by Ed Young). I love this book because of the surprising reveal at the end. The book is not as it appears. Rather than separate pages, the book is constructed as one long (folded) page, mimicking a Chinese scroll. The second surprise is that the story is told in Chinese characters on the back of the “scroll”. In honor of this book, the first graders created a two-sided get well scroll. Included in the illustrations were my favorite drink (coffee), my favorite team (Red Sox) and even an illustration of my new hip!

Second and third graders love folk and fairy tales and we do a great deal of work with them throughout the year. Retellings (or fractured fairy tales) are some of their favorites. So, they wrote their own. While not intended as get well stories, laughter being the best medicine, their curative power was potent. Whether it was three little chipmunks evading a chainsaw, book nerds evading a bully or squid elephants who like sushi, I chuckled the afternoon away and felt better immediately.

As part of our extensive research unit in fourth grade, we have just begun to venture into website evaluation. Our learning objective was for students to realize that they must be able to distinguish between fact and fiction, what is true and what is false on the Internet. After visiting several bogus and several real sites, the children were challenged to make a small project with a fact (or fiction) about themselves. It was my job to determine what was true and what was false, a fun activity for the long hours I was at home. I learned about Native American relatives, scrunchie collections and how much older sisters’ prom dresses  cost. Oh, and also that one of them is NOT secretly Bigfoot.

Cootie Catcher, Origami, Book within a Book and Popup Technology

Cootie Catcher, Origami, Book within a Book and Popup Technology

As Dick Van Dyke sang in Bye Bye Birdie, you can “spread sunshine all over the place (if you) just put on a happy face.” The reverse proves true as well. The sunshine radiating from my fifth graders sun-themed shape poems put a radiant smile on my face. Vibrant, amusing and lyrical, these works of art were shining rays of warmth during my recuperative phase.

Ally’s poem (illustration unavailable) sums it up best:

“When the sun rises. Up, up and up. Over the waving sea. On top of the never ending plains. Traveling across the mountains. Brightening the world. Sharing secrets with the clouds. All I can do is smile!”

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The very busy librarians

Thanks to the assistance of my high-energy, motivated and creative student teacher, Jenn Potter, we have had a very busy January and February at the Peaslee Library. Peasleecott Awards, Book Trailers, taking on the major task of reorganizing the Dewey Decimal section, first grade research starters, MSLA bookmark contest and a Leo Lionni inspired mural. I’ll have to up my game in March to keep up!