The Maker Mind at Peaslee School

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Teaching Today's Learner

The Maker Mind at Peaslee School

Guest Blogger: Nancy Kellner

Display case with Maker Mind projects The Maker Mindset encourages educators to look at the curriculum through a new lens: Makers solve problems. Makers create. Makers think. Makers invent. Makers share.

One of the goals of both library and technology instruction at Peaslee School is to integrate seamlessly into the classroom curriculum. A recent Professional Development workshop was devoted to looking at the existing curriculum through the Maker Mindset.

Whether we are talking about how we are teaching and learning, what we are teaching and learning or where we are teaching and learning, it can be summed up with one concept—the Maker Mind. While this terminology might be new, the pedagogy isn’t really. Kindergarteners build sets out of blocks for their dramatic play, third graders create terrariums during a plant unit and fourth graders invent musical instruments while studying sound.

Hands-on learning has been around since…

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Digital Balance

Dot by Randi Zuckerberg

Dot by Randi Zuckerberg

 

When my colleague, first grade teacher Eileen Badstubner, commented that she was concerned about the amount of time her young students spent in front of screens, my response was “Have I got a book for you!”

Dot by Randi Zuckerberg (sister of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and  a social media expert in her own right) is a simple, straightforward paean to a life that balances the connectedness of technology with the equally important connection to the world beyond the screen.

The recommendation turned out to be much more than a just-in-time readers advisory. The students loved the book so much that Eileen and I decided to take the read-aloud one step further. Taking a page out of Randi’s book (literally and figuratively) we came up with an idea that combined both old school and new school tools.  Using good ol’ markers and paper, each student created his/her own interpretation of one of the pages in the book. These were scanned into the app Explain Everything. Then, one by one (with the cooperation of Eileen and her co-teacher Jessica Alderman), the students joined me in the library to tap, touch, swipe and speak the words and actions to make their drawings come alive.

As I noted in my previous two posts about working with kindergarten students as individuals rather than in a whole class setting, technology that allows for every voice to be heard is worth a little time in front of a screen. Won’t you spend 2 minutes and 13 seconds for a little reminder about what life is really all about?

This is Dot. Dot Knows a lot.

This is Dot. Dot Knows a lot.


Kindergarten Voices

What would you do if you found these puddles in your backyard.

Puddles!

What would you do if you found these puddles in your backyard? After reading Puddles by Jonathan London, Mrs. Lewis’ kindergarten class was asked to comment on this illustration from the book. Listen to their answers here.

Yesterday I wrote about using Voicethread for the first time with Mrs. Cahill’s kindergarten class. It was so successful in engaging every single student that I couldn’t wait to replicate that success with another class. Voicethread is so easy to use that I was able to set up this new project on the iPad and “train” a parent volunteer in less than ten minutes. Voila! A closing activity, that while not technically an assessment, at least demonstrates the engagement each child had with the read aloud of the day.

The beauty of Voicethread, as used in this manner, is that every child can comment independently without hearing the comments of their classmates. This paints a more genuine picture of what they are seeing and thinking. Each individual has a chance to be heard.

Thoughts are already percolating on future uses. Viewing primary source documents, evaluating illustrations, reading graphs, writing stories…the possibilities are endless.

 

 


Let Every Voice Be Heard

Mud by Mary Lyn Ray

Mud by Mary Lyn Ray

As in any class there are the ones who always raise their hands, the ones too impatient to even wait to be called upon and the quiet ones who listen but never offer comments or observations. Whether it is due to shyness, introversion or just a lack of confidence, these silent children don’t have as many opportunities to share what they think.

Sure there’s “Think, Pair, Share” and “Exit Tickets” and a whole catalog of other strategies. But I continue to seek out new and different ways to let every voice be heard (even if just as a whisper). Given that I have less than a half hour of instructional time per week with my students, it is often collaboration with teachers that allows me to reach this goal. Collaboration, in conjunction with technology, has opened the door for children to speak up and speak out.

The latest venture involved kindergartners making predictions about the book Mud by Mary Lyn Ray. The predictions were based on viewing two illustrations from the book. Using Voicethread, their teacher, Stacy Cahill and I showed the children how to comment on the images. All nineteen students were given the opportunity, the wait time and the encouragement to record their own voices. And speak up they did! Listen to the wisdom of the children here.

The images students commented upon

The images students commented upon

Extra time (via collaboration) and technology provide the perfect solution to the imbalance of classroom participation. Whether it is this delightful kindergarten experience, the Readers Theater I wrote about here (thanks Amy Melisi) or the Book Trailers I wrote about here (thanks Andi Daunais and Lisa Miranda and Nick Greenwood), teacher partnerships and new technologies are giving our students the opportunity to say what they need to say.